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Arctic cruise through the Northwest Passage from Greenland to Nunavut


The Northwest Passage represents the pinnacle of Arctic exploration. On this trip, like the explorers before us, we’ll experience the quaint villages, dramatic fjords, and calving glaciers of Greenland, working our way north to spectacular Kap York. Then, crossing Smith Sound, we’ll visit Aujuittuq (Grise Fiord), Canada’s northernmost community, and pay respects at the Franklin Expedition graves at Beechey Island. Melville, Banks, and Devon Islands offer opportunities to spot Peary caribou, polar bear, walrus and musk ox—and visits to ghostly rcmp and Hudson’s Bay Company posts. Prince of Wales Strait affords a striking passage to Amundsen Gulf and our destination: Kugluktuk (Coppermine), the end of our epic journey above the Arctic Circle.

To sail the Northwest Passage is to sail through living history, to sail the haunting landscapes that have enchanted explorers for centuries. In the fierce and untameable wilds lies a stark beauty—the remote reaches of the north have a power that is all their own. Join the ranks of the fearless adventurers who have been lured by the Northwest Passage’s spirit.

ATTENTION SINGLE TRAVELLERS: This cruise welcomes solo travellers. Most cabin categories on the ship are available as a private cabin to single travellers for no additional cost.

 

STARTING AT
$9995.00 USD
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TRIP DETAILS
DESTINATION
EQUIPMENT/CLOTHING
ACCOMMODATIONS
MEALS & DINING
DATES & PRICING
ITINERARY
TRIP TYPE
Cruises & Boat Tours
SEASON

August to September

DIFFICULTY
Easy / Moderate
MAXIMUM GROUP SIZE
198
GUIDE INFORMATION

Tours are guided by the expedition staff that may include artistic, cultural and natural history specialists.

RESTRICTIONS

This program features activities such as walking, wildlife viewing and Zodiac cruising, all at a relatively easy to moderate level of exertion. You will need to be able climb into and out of landing crafts (assistance is provided), and some of the landings will be “wet,” requiring that you wear waterproof boots. A reasonable level of mobility is required to fully enjoy this travel program and to ensure the steady movements of the larger group of passengers.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Requirements: Arrival flights to the starting point and departure flights from the last community, personal expenses (laundry, alcoholic beverages, telephone calls, etc.), additional expenses in the event of weather delays or itinerary changes, staff gratuities, mandatory medical evacuation coverage, optional travel insurance, possible fuel charges.

Comments: $250 US per person Discovery Fund fee applies.

 

TRANSPORTATION

This cruise begins in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland and ends in Kugluktuk (Coppermine River).

Charter flights from Toronto, Ontario to Kangerlussuaq and from Kugluktuk to Calgary, Alberta can be added to the package for $2595 US per person.

WEATHER

Temperatures run around 8 to 15 degrees Celsius (46° to 60°  Fahrenheit) on average. That being said, there has been more than one day enjoyed in shorts and a t-shirt on deck in the Canadian Arctic! However, temperatures can fall below zero (especially at night) and the the snow can fly at anytime. 

REGION
Nunavut
PROVIDED EQUIPMENT

All Zodiac excursions, educational programs, pre-departure materials, service charges and port fees.

SUGGESTED CLOTHING

Warm coat, long sleeved shirts, sweaters, long pants, wind jacket, wind pants, rain gear, rubber boots, hiking boots, hat, gloves.  Full clothing listed supplied upon booking.

SUGGESTED ITEMS

Camera, daypack, sunglasses, sunscreen, water bottle.

ACCOMMODATIONS

The cruise takes place aboard the Ocean Endeavour. Sailing with a maximum of 198-passengers, Ocean Endeavour is the perfect vessel for expedition cruising. Outfitted with twenty Zodiacs, advanced navigation equipment, multiple lounges and a top deck observation room, she is purpose-built for passenger experiences in remote environments. The Ocean Endeavour boasts a 1B ice class, enabling her to freely explore throughout the Arctic summer. Launched in 1982, she has had numerous upgrades, most recently in 2010 and 2014.

At 137 meters (450ft) in length, Ocean Endeavour has plenty of interior and exterior space. Enjoy multiple decks offering comfortable lounge chairs, outdoor dining, a swimming pool, sauna and even a hot tub! The spacious interiors allow for multiple workshops and presentations to occur simultaneously. Community is at the heart of Adventure Canada's expedition experience. We gather together to learn, enjoy a drink, sing a song or share a yarn - connecting with one and other. The three lounges aboard Ocean Endeavour are fantastic public spaces for seminars, events and dialogue. The Ocean Endeavour's private spaces are stylish and comfortable. All cabins have private washroom facilities, a phone for internal calls, radio, TV and air-conditioning. 

 

MEALS & DINING

MEALS & DINING

All meals starting with lunch on the first day and breakfast on the last day are included. Meals are prepared fresh daily by the on-site chef and are served in the dining room three times a day. Snacks and hot and cold drinks are always available in the forward lounge throughout the day. 

Aug 17, 2019 - Sep 02, 2019
$9995.00 / per person - USD
Category 1. Quad occupancy. Quad cabin. Deck four. Interior Cabin, four lower berths, private bath.

$11895.00 / per person - USD
Category 2. Triple occupancy. Triple cabin. Deck four. Interior Cabin, three lower berths, private bath.

$13595.00 / per person - USD
Category 3. Double occupancy. Interior twin cabin. Deck five. Interior Cabin, two lower berths, private bath.

$15095.00 / per person - USD
Category 4. Double occupancy. Exterior twin cabin. Deck four. Porthole window, two lower berths, private bath.

$16595.00 / per person - USD
Category 5. Double occupancy. Main twin cabin. Deck five. Picture window, two lower berths, private bath.

$18095.00 / per person - USD
Category 6. Double occupancy. Comfort twin cabin. Deck seven. Picture windows (partial obstruction), two lower berths, private bath, refrigerator.

$19595.00 / per person - USD
Category 7. Double occupancy. Top deck twin cabin. Deck eight. Large picture windows (partial obstruction), matrimonial bed, private bath, refrigerator.

$21095.00 / per person - CAD
Category 8. Double occupancy. Superior twin cabin. Deck five & seven. Picture windows, twin or matrimonial bed, private bath, refrigerator.

$22595.00 / per person - USD
Category 9. Double occupancy. Junior suite. Deck five & seven. Picture windows, separate sitting area, sofa, desk, refrigerator, matrimonial bed, private bath.

$24095.00 / per person - USD
Category 10. Double occupancy. Suite. Deck seven. Picture windows overlooking the bow, separate sitting area, sofa, desk, refrigerator, matrimonial bed, private bath with full tub.
PAYMENT INFORMATION
Pricing does not include:

A $1000.00 deposit is required to hold your reservation.

Balance of payment is due 120 days before trip commencement.
CANCELLATION POLICY & DETAILS
All prices are in US dollars. All requests for cancellations must be received in writing. Cancellations received at least 120 days prior to departure are fully refunded less an administration fee of $500 US dollars per passenger. If cancellation is made between 91 and 120 days, cancellation charge is 65% of cruise cost. Please note that within the 90-day limit, all deposits and tariffs are forfeited.

Aug 17, 2019 - Sep 02, 2019

Day 1

Kangerlussuaq
Sondre Stromfjord is one of the longest fjords in the world, boasts 168 kilometres of superb scenery and calm waters. Kangerlussuaq, the town at its eastern head, means ‘the big fjord.’
We begin our adventure by sailing down this dramatic fjord as the sun sets before us.

Day 2

Sisimiut
Blessed with an ice-free harbour year-round, Sisimiut has been inhabited for the last 4,500 years, first by the the Saqqaq, the Dorset, and then by the Thule (the ancestors of today's Inuit). Their descendants form the majority of its present-day population of some 6,000 inhabitants. It is the largest business centre north of Nuuk and the fastest-growing community in Greenland. 

Day 3

Day 3-4

Ilulissat
Ilulissat translates literally into “iceberg”, and there couldn’t be a more fitting name for this spectacular place. Our visit will include time in the colourful town, famed for its handicrafts, cafes, museums, and picturesque habitation. We’ll have a chance to hike out along a boardwalk to an elevated viewpoint where we can observe the great fields of ice. We will also cruise in our fleet of Zodiacs in the UNESCO World Heritage Site of the Ilulissat Icefjord. The Sermeq Kujalleq Glacier is one of the most active and fastest moving in the world at nineteen metres per day and calving more than thirty-five square kilometres of ice annually. The glacier has been the object of scientific attention for 250 years.

Day 5

Days 5-6

Western Greenland
Today we will cruise one of Greenland’s most spectacular fjords, known for plentiful marine life, plentiful icebergs and inspiring landscapes. Seals use the long leads created by high winds in this region to hunt the rich waters of the fjord. The cliffs and talus slopes within the fjord should give us good opportunities to see colonies of dovekies. Time spent on deck today should result in some good wildlife sightings, not to mention unbeatable photographic opportunities of icebergs amid mountain peaks.

Day 7

Qikiqtarjuaq
Qikiqtarjuaq, a community located on Broughton Island, is known for its wildlife, whale watching, and as an access point for Auyuittuq National Park. It is one of the Nunavut communities closest to Greenland. Qikiqtarjuaq (fondly called “Qik”, for short) is known as the iceberg capital of Nunavut and was home to a NORAD military station that formed part of the Distant Early Warning (DEW) line in the 1950s.

Qikiqtarjuaq also boasts a burgeoning traditional Inuit craft industry, and local craftspeople are eager to share their wares. Talented local artists produce Inuit carvings, with a particular focus on intricate ivory work and jewelry. The community is famously warm and welcoming of visitors.

Day 8

East Baffin

Today we will explore the eastern coast of Baffin Island or Qikiqtaaluk in the region of Auyuittuq National Park. Named after English explorer William Baffin, Baffin Island is the largest island in Canada, and home to 11,000 people. Likely known to Pre-Columbian Norse of Greenland and Iceland during the eleventh century, the island is presumed to be the Helluland of the Viking sagas. The Penny Ice Cap and the Barnes Ice Cap are the largest ice caps on the island, both remnants of the Laurentide ice sheet that once covered much of the North American continent. Both are currently in a state of retreat.

Day 9

Northeast Baffin 
Today will be an expedition day in the truest sense as we navigate the fjords of northeast Baffin Island. The Ocean Endeavour is the perfect vessel for exploring these hidden treasures of the north, as her manoeuvrability and shallow draft allow her to access regions that would be impassable to larger vessels. Moving through waters known to harbour belugas, narwhals, and other marine mammals, we will be monitoring at all times from the deck and bridge to maximize our wildlife opportunities.

Day 10

Devon Island
Devon Island is the largest uninhabited island on earth and comprises over fifty thousand square kilometres. It was first sighted by Europeans in 1616, though they never set up a base here until the arrival of the Hudson’s Bay Company, three hundred years later—a short-lived endeavour now long abandonned. The island's geology consists of reddish Precambrian gneiss and Paeleozoic siltstones and shales; a landscape so barren in places that NASA has tested its Mars rovers at Devon Island. Substantial Thule sites are among Devon Island’s many treasures.

Day 11

Beechey Island
In 1845, Sir John Franklin took his expedition of 129 men and two ships into the Wellington Channel. Not a soul returned from the fateful expedition. The three graves found at Beechey Island left no indication as to the fate of the rest of the British party, but the island gradually became a touchpoint for those searching for survivors. A fourth grave on Beechey today holds a sailor from one such expedition. In the autumn of 2014, Canadian archaeologists discovered remnants of the HMS Erebus and in 2016, Franklin’s second ship, the Terror was also located.

Day 12

Day 12-13

Peel Sound and Parry Channel 

Sailing Peel Sound, we get into serious polar bear country and will be on the lookout for good spotting opportunities. Parry Channel is named after Arctic explorer William Edward Parry who got as far as Melville Island in 1819 before being blocked by ice at McClure Strait. Depending on ice conditions, we may make expedition stops along the way among the spectacular landscapes, a perfect setting for hiking and exploring the geological diversity of the area. 

Day 14

Usqsuqtuuq (Gjøa Haven) 
In 1903, explorer Roald Amundsen attempted the Northwest Passage, sailing through the James Ross Strait. Unable to proceed due to sea ice, he spent the winters of 1903–04 and 1904–05 in the beautiful harbour he found—Usqsuqtuuq. While there, he learned Arctic living skills from the local Netsilik Inuit, skills that would later prove invaluable in his Antarctic explorations. He used his ship, Gjøa, as a base for explorations in the summer of 1904, sledding the Boothia Peninsula and travelling to the magnetic North Pole. Usqsuqtuuq offers a lot to its visitors, including he Northwest Passage Territorial Historic Park, and Canada’s most northerly golf course. Although Usqsuqtuuq is becoming more modern, many traditional Inuit activities are still being enjoyed, including throat singing, drum dancing, and hunting.

Day 15

Queen Maud Gulf

Sir John Franklin’s flagship, the HMS Erebus, was a Hecla-class bomb vessel, built in Wales in 1826. She was named after the dark region in Hades of Greek mythology and weighed 372 tons. The ship took part in the Ross Expedition from 1839 to 1843, and was abandoned during the legendary Franklin Expedition after becoming icebound during an attempt to locate the fabled Northwest Passage. Her sunken wreck had actually been designated a National Historic Site prior to being located in September of 2014 by a Parks Canada underwater archaeology team. Two years later, Franklin’s other ship, Terror, was located, spurring further interest in one of the great mysteries of polar exploration.

Day 16

Coronation Gulf

Located between Victoria Island and the Arctic coast of mainland Canada, the Coronation Gulf is an extensive body of water that is linked to the Arctic Ocean via the Dolphin and Union Strait on the west and by the Dease Strait and Queen Maud Gulf on the east. 

The gulf was named in 1821 by John Franklin in honour of the coronation of King George IV. The environment and Inuit cultural history of the region was studied by Rudolph Anderson and Diamond Jenness in 1916 as part of the Canadian Arctic Expedition. We will be exploring the area scouting for an opportunistic expedition stop.

Day 17

Kugluktuk (Coppermine)
Located at the mouth of the Coppermine River, southwest of Victoria Island on the Coronation Gulf, Kugluktuk is the western most community in Nunavut. Coppermine reverted to its original Inuinnaqtun name—Kugluktuk, meaning “place of moving waters”—on January 1st, 1996. The Coppermine River is designated a Canadian Heritage River for the important role it played as an exploration and fur trade route. Copper deposits along the river attracted the first European explorers to the area. Today we will disembark the Ocean Endeavour and make our way to the airport to meet our charter flights home.