What to Do in Iceland in July

Spice it up and visit Iceland while it’s hot (sort of)!

Joe Tobin

|June 26, 2019

Joe is a proud Michigander that finds himself in unusual, beautiful, and faraway places. He enjoys getting lost, drinking with strangers, and worshipping at the church of rock ‘n’ roll.


July is one of Iceland’s more busy months and with good reason. The beautiful weather July brings opens up all of Iceland for you to explore. Long days mean more sights and more fun. Get out on the water in a kayak or raft. Zip on a wetsuit and dive in between two tectonic plates. Chase down Puffins and whales. Lace up your boots and hike it all. Experience summer the Icelandic way.


Things to Do in Iceland in July

South Coast Iceland Skogafoss Waterfall

Skogafoss Waterfall on Iceland' South Coast

Explore the South Coast of Iceland

Venture south of the capital and explore Iceland’s South Coast. The extra daylight will come in handy as you visit almost all of the islands iconic natural phenomena. The July weather will beautifully compliment the black sanded Reynisfjara, the Skogafoss and Seljalandsfoss, and the mighty Sólheimajökull Glacier. Gaze out across the Atlantic from the enchanting little town of Vík, soak in the summer sun rays, and beat yourself up for not doing this sooner.

Camping Place In Iceland With Tents By The Lake

Summer hiking & camping on the South Coast

Hiking & Camping

July weather is mild and that means you can spend more time out in nature and less time hunkered down in a humid bar. Get outside and explore during all 20 hours of Iceland’s extended daylight. Hike a glacier, a volcano, out to natural hot springs, along the black sand beaches, under a waterfall. Only in Iceland can all of this be seen and enjoyed by foot.

Iceland Trail Running Event Ultra Marathon

Find your stride in Iceland

Terrain Runs & Marathons

Venture up to the Þorvaldsdalur Valley in northern Iceland for the Thorvaldsdalur Terrain Run. Taking place on July 6th, early July every year, Thorvaldsdalur is the oldest terrain run In Iceland.

If your idea of a good time is measured in miles (or kilometers), sign up for The Laugavegur Ultra Marathon. Criss-cross South Iceland’s scenic and boundless beauty this July 13th.

Road In Iceland On Ring Road Trip

One Ring Road to rule them all

Drive The Ring Road

July is one of the best times to rent a car and hit the open road. Each of the regions of Iceland has something special and different to offer visitors. Pick a direction and go or take the tried-and-true Ring Road for the definitive Icelandic asphalt experience.

What's Going on in Iceland in July

Girl Is Dancing In Music Festival

Dance your heart out at Iceland's July festivals

July is festival season in Iceland! The long, mid-summer days are home to several annual festivals and unique events. Spread out over the whole month, July’s got an occasion for every type of traveler.

Siglufjörður Folk Music Festival: July 3rd-7th / Siglufjörður, North Iceland — Folk and more folk! 19 concerts in total, mostly traditional Icelandic and Scandinavian, also featuring some dancing and world music. 

Rauðasandur Festival: July 5th-7th / Rauðasandur (Red Sands) of the West Fjords of Iceland — A family-friendly non-profit festival with something for everyone. Folk, country, blues, reggae, and even a sand castle competition on the red sand beach of Rauðasandur. 

Eistnaflug Music Festival: July 10th-13th / Neskaupsstaður, East Iceland — Three days of heavy metal and rock ‘n’ roll. A Nordic staple full of local and Scandinavian bands.

Lunga Art Festival: July 14th-21th / Seydisfjordur, East Iceland — Workshops, lectures, and exhibitions revolving around aesthetics, concludes with concerts and celebrations. Art at it’s frigid finest! 

Medieval Days at Gásir: July 19th-21st / Gásir, North Iceland (Eyjafjordur) — A re-created Medieval village on a local historical site. Join in for some craft demonstrations, games, and some Medieval role-play. 

Reykholt Chamber Music Festival: July 26th-28th / Reykholt, South Iceland — The place to be for those who really know and love music. One of the oldest festivals in Iceland and considered to be essential to Iceland’s music scene.

What to Know About Iceland in July

Girl Sweater Iceland Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon Person

Crisp clarity at Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon in Iceland

Weather in Iceland in July

Iceland weather in July is what the locals like to call “sweater weather.” A sweater, pants, some hiking shoes, and a jacket should be more than enough to keep you comfortable. The warm, mild weather and long hours of daylight make July the perfect time to visit for travelers looking to get outdoors and spend every waking minute exploring the Icelandic wilderness.

July is Iceland's hottest month with temperatures averaging a nice 51.4°F (10.8°C). Iceland in July receives around 51mm of rainfall and gets close to 20 hours of daylight, allowing you to sightsee long into the night.

Packing Iceland Gear Pack List July Travel

Don't forget to bring a towel

The Packing List

Remember, Iceland is located just outside of the Arctic Circle — tanks, shorts, and flip-flops aren’t extremely practical, even in July. Do as the locals do and learn to layer! Bringing several pieces of clothing allows you to adjust to Iceland's always-changing weather.

Pack yourself a pair of gloves, warm hat, scarf, sweaters, pants, a change or two of shorts, good hiking boots or shoes, waterproof jacket and pants, plenty of socks, a day pack, and don’t forget some sunglasses to shade you from the almost continual sunlight. Of course, remember to pack your bathing suit for a dip in one of Iceland’s famous geothermal pools!

Is Iceland crowded in July?

Book tours and accommodations in advance. July is peak season in Iceland since the weather is great and there is plenty to see or do, but that means that many hotels, trips, and experiences will likely be full or pre-booked.

Can you see the Northern Lights in Iceland in July?

Iceland Northern Lights Winter Cold

Northern Lights love winter nights

Summer is not a good time to see the Northern Lights. The days are long and the nights are short in July making it quite impossible to see the Northern Lights. It would be better to visit Iceland during the winter months if you’re dead-set on seeing the If the Aurora Borealis light up the night sky.

Best Tours in Iceland for July

2-Day South Coast & Ice Cave Tour: Perfect for those who want to fit as much in with only a couple of days to spare. Follow the South Coast and journey to Vatnajökul National Park, homes to Europes largest glacier, walk upon the black sanded Reynisfjara Beach, feel the spray of Seljalandsfoss and Skogafoss waterfalls, delve into the Crystal Ice Cave, witness the Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon and wander sparkling Diamond Beach. Check off all of Iceland’s exotic, can’t-miss natural wonders on a one-weekend getaway!

Skaftafell Ice Cave Vatnajokull Iceland

6-Day Ring Road Tour from Reykjavik: A heavy hitting tour that pulls out all the stops. Experience everything Iceland has to offer over six full days of hiking colorful canyons, chasing wild whales, steaming in hot springs, basking beneath waterfalls, and strolling ancient lava fields. Visit the wild natural curiosities of Þingvellir National Park, the Geysir Hot Springs, the unusual Lake Mývatn, and the waterfalls Gullfoss, Seljalandsfoss, and Skógafoss. Take the stress out of your story and travel Iceland in style knowing, for sure, you won’t miss a single sight!

Gljufrabui Waterfall Iceland

Landmannalaugar Hiking Tour from Reykjavik: Trek the first part of the legendary Laugavegur Trail through the color-changing rhyolite mountains of Landmannalaugar. Spend a full day questing the Highlands on the first leg of Iceland most renowned hiking trail. Crest the peaks of Mount Brennisteinsalda and Bláhnjúkur and journey through the emerald Graenagil Gorge and alien Laugahraun Lava Field. Enjoy 8-10 kilometers of natural bliss ending a hot spring soak. Lace up your boots and hike!

 

Get off the usual "palm tree and flip-flop path" and experience summer a la Iceland this July!

A Man Jumping In Landmannalaugar