Cruising Tour

Arctic Cruise from Baffin Island to Greenland | CA-AC1301

An expedition to astonishing wildlife and artists in the Arctic communities of Greenland and Canada

Overview

Immerse yourself in rich landscapes and communities, come face to face with Arctic wildlife, and breathe in the crisp, polar air of the Arctic circle

Board the Ocean Endeavour and follow in the wake of 19th-century explorers across the Davis Strait and Arctic coast of Quebec. Explore the creative world of Inuit art, which mixes ancient and modern styles in a changing world. Get up close and personal with awe-inspiring Arctic landscapes and wildlife, including bowhead whales, birds, bears, and caribou.

  • No single supplement in select cabin categories
  • Zodiac boat
  • Lecture Series by Expedition Leaders
  • Ice-Class Expedition Ship
  • Family-owned and -operated ship
Available July
Duration 13 days
Departs From Iqluit, NU
Minimum age No limit
Difficulty Level Easy
Group maximum 198
Meet on Location Yes
Pick Up No

From

4 995 USD

Per Adult

  • Best Price Guarantee
  • Toll Free number in N. America: +1 888 285 1676
  • International number: +1 780 414 1676
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What's Included

Find out what is included and not.

Included

  • Educational program and pre-departure materials
  • All shore and Zodiac excursions
  • Transfers between piers and applicable airports
  • Service charges
  • Embarkation taxes
  • Port fees

What to bring

  • Warm outdoor clothing
  • Hiking boots
  • Rain gear and Rubber boots
  • Camera
  • Binoculars
  • Water bottle
  • Day pack
  • Full list supplied upon booking

Not Included

  • Arrival flights to the starting point and departure flights from last stop
  • Personal expenses (laundry, alcoholic beverages, telephone calls, etc.)
  • Additional expenses in the event of weather delays or itinerary changes
  • Staff gratuities
  • Mandatory medical evacuation coverage/optional travel insurance
  • Possible fuel surcharges

Contact us for more Information about this tour

Itinerary

Find out more details about the tour and its highlights

Information

This 13-Day Arctic Cruise in the wake of 19th-century explorers is a fantastic introduction to the wildlife, geography, and local communities that paint the Arctic landscape.

Availability (2020): Jul 19 - Jul 31.

  • $4995.00 per person / USD. Category 1. Quad cabin. Deck four. Interior Cabin, four lower berths, private bath. Based on quad occupancy.
  • $5995.00 per person / USD. Category 2. Triple cabin. Deck four. Interior Cabin, three lower berths, private bath. Based on triple occupancy.
  • $7395.00 per person / USD. Category 3. Interior twin cabin. Deck five. Interior Cabin, two lower berths, private bath. Based on double occupancy.
  • $8695.00 per person / USD. Category 4. Exterior twin cabin. Deck four. Porthole window, two lower berths, private bath. Based on double occupancy.
  • $9995.00 per person / USD. Category 5. Main twin cabin. Deck five. Picture window, two lower berths, private bath. Based on double occupancy.
  • $11295.00 per person / USD. Category 6. Comfort twin cabin. Deck seven. Picture windows (partial obstruction), two lower berths, private bath, refrigerator. Based on double occupancy.
  • $12595.00 per person / USD. Category 7. Top deck twin cabin. Deck eight. Large picture windows (partial obstruction), matrimonial bed, private bath, refrigerator. Based on double occupancy.
  • $13895.00 per person / USD. Category 8. Superior twin cabin. Deck five & seven. Picture windows, twin or matrimonial bed, private bath, refrigerator. Based on double occupancy.
  • $15195.00 per person / USD. Category 9. Junior suite. Deck five & seven. Picture windows, separate sitting area, sofa, desk, refrigerator, matrimonial bed, private bath. Based on double occupancy.
  • $16495.00 per person / USD. Category 10. Owner's suite. Deck seven. Picture windows overlooking the bow, separate sitting area, sofa, desk, refrigerator, matrimonial bed, private bath with full tub. Based on double occupancy.

We’ll be embarking on our ship from the community of Iqaluit. Located at the head of Frobisher Peak, Iqaluit is the bustling capital of Nunavut. In Inuktitut language, the name is “place of fish.” It was known as Frobisher Bay between 1942-87, after which the original name was restored. Despite its small population of 8,000, there are plenty of attractions to see here, such as art galleries and the igloo-inspired St. Jude’s Cathedral.

Board the Zodiac ships and zoom across strong tides to the Ocean Endeavour. Our cruise ship is awaiting us in busy Iqaluit harbor. Once you’re onboard, we’ll begin our journey together down Frobisher Bay.

Today, we’ll be sailing at sea on our way around the southern tip of Baffin Island, named after the English explorer William Baffin. Be on the lookout for wildlife--marine mammals, seabirds and schools of fishes. Our geologists will have you raving about rocks, and taking a hard look at the tundra plants. Soak up the Arctic splendor of the steep cliffs, rocky coastlines, and gentle waves.

Named after explorer Sir Martin Frobisher during his quest for the Northwest Passage, the bay is quite a long one. This large inlet stretches out 143 mi (230 km), with a width of around 12-25 mi (20-40 km). We'll pass loads of tiny bays, sounds and islets, many of which are uninhabited.

One of the most charming communities on this coast, Kimmirut is also known as Lake Harbour, a major artists’ enclave in the region. As once the home of a Hudson Bay Company post, the community is still a major outpost when it comes to art.

We’ll peek into the Dewey Soper Building for outstanding works of art. The Inuktitut name means “the heel,” referring to an outcrop of marble across the bay. The community was established around an Anglican mission in 1909, and to this day hosts a population of less than 400.

Bookended between rocky hills and Hudson Strait, Dorset Island is home to another community cultivated by local artists. Also known as Kinngait, the town has been dubbed “the community that art built.” Between 1950 and 1962, Kinngait hosted a historic collaboration between James and Alma Houston and local Inuit artists--an effort that launched Inuit art onto the world stage.

In 1959, locals established the West Baffin Eskimo Cooperative, the oldest arts organization in the Canadian Arctic. Here you can find works from Inuit printmakers, carvers and visual artists and the oldest professional Inuit printmaking studio in Canada. Over time, Kinngait has firmly established itself as the world capital of Inuit art.

On this day of exploration, we’ll make the most of wind, weather and wildlife have to offer. We will navigate the icy waters of Hudson Strait. Our expedition staff will scan for polar bear, walrus, seal and seabirds as we glide through the ocean.

Today, we glide into Quebec’s northernmost community. Ivujivik rests at the confluence of Hudson Strait and Hudson Bay, so you can expect loads of wildlife in the region. Throughout the year, you can spot ringed seals, bearded seals, walruses, belugas, polar bears, musk-oxen, caribous and birds like geese and eider duck.

Archaeological finds in the area show evidence of inhabitants dating back 3,000 years. These were the Thule People probably drawn to the area by game migration. On nearby Digges Island, Europeans and the Inuit of Nunavik met for the first time in 1610.

As the village is ice-free for less than a month in the summer, most people rely on Ivujivik Airport for supplies and visits. There are less than 500 people living in this charming remote village,  the majority of whom are indigenous Inuit.

We’ll spend a day out in the Ungava wilderness. This region is known for its tundra rich in diverse geology, dwarf flora and glacial lakes, yet barren of large trees. We’ll hop onboard our Zodiac to explore the inlets, and land to strike out on trails on an easy day trip from our cruise ship.

Altogether there are around 10,000 inhabitants, mostly Inuit, who live in 12 villages along the coast. Hopefully we’ll see some local wildlife: caribou, waterfowl, fox, wolverine, Arctic hare, walrus, seal and whale. A curious fact is that one of the world's best gins, Ungava Gin by Domaine Pinnacle, is produced with botanicals that are exclusively harvested from this region.

The island of Akpatok is the largest in Ungava Bay, at more than 347 sq mi (900 sq km). Though there aren’t any people living on the island, it’s home to a huge population of akpat--thick-billed murres in the auk family.

These curious, penguin-like birds flock on ledges along the lofty cliffs to lay their eggs on the bare rocks. A couple will lay just one single egg each year. The akpat is known for its harsh cackling calls, its awkwardness when it comes to flying, and as a relative to the, now extinct, great auk. We’ll climb aboard our Zodiacs and scout the shorelines for glimpses of polar bears, walruses, and other marine life.

We continue our expedition around the east shoreline of Ungava Bay. Here, we’ll set out on a search for polar bears and check out an abandoned fishing community. As always, we’ll keep our eyes peeled with guidance from the expedition staff, for a chance to glimpse these awe-inspiring beasts and majestic marine mammals.

It’s time for our fascinating lecture series from our resourceful expedition team. We’ll learn all about the history, geology and wildlife of the region as we steam across the Davis Strait on toward Greenland. With a full day out at  sea, it’s an excellent time to sit back and unwind in our library, or dive right in with workshops, presentations and documentaries.

Learn from some of the best scientists and specialists who have spent their whole lives out in the Arctic. While out on deck, keep your binoculars ready for minke and humpback whales amid pack ice, as well as seabirds that are sure to mark our passage.

Welcome to Nuuk, the capital of Greenland, which bridges the Old and the New Worlds. The old harbor is adorable, with many buildings dating back from the Danish colonial times. Nuuk’s downtown is more modern, with shopping, cafes and restaurants with European flair.

The Greenland National Museum houses the world-famous Qilakitsoq mummies. The museum’s exhibits also offer in-depth information about the colonial, Norse, and Inuit presence in Greenland—a must-see.

The western Greenland coastline is a rich collection of fishing communities, islands and complex coastal waterways. Thanks to its subarctic location and the West Greenland Current, the waters are relatively warm here. This makes for abundant northerly wildlife and lush vegetation as compared with the rest of Greenland.

This is a day in the spirit of expedition travel and we’ll avail ourselves of the opportunities that present themselves. All is dependent on the weather conditions, of course.

Lying at the head of the longest fjord in western Greenland, Kangerlussuaq has one of the most stable climates in the region though temperatures can range from -58°F (-50°C) in the winter to as high as 82°F (28°C) in summer.

Kangerlussuaq, which means 'The Big Fjord' in Greenlandic, is appropriately named as it stretches for around 168 km. This stunning sight marks the end of our voyage!

On disembarkation, we’ll transfer to shore by Zodiac, and hop on a bus along Greenland’s longest road, less than 20 km. Then we’ll board our charter flight to Toronto (optional add-on).

Our vessel for this voyage is the Ocean Endeavour. A 1B ice-class sailing boat with a maximum of 198-passengers and outfitted with 20 Zodiac boats, our ship is perfect for expedition cruises. Facilities include a top deck observation room, swimming pool, outdoor dining, sauna spa, library, and top-class navigation equipment.

Our three onboard lounges are excellent public spaces for our educational seminars, workshops, and entertainment. Launched in 1982, she’s been upgraded many times, most recently in 2010 and 2014. At 137-m (450-ft) length and 21-m (69-ft) breadth, the Ocean Endeavour is the pride of our cruises in Canada and beyond.

Learn more about the Ocean Endeavour

  • No Single Supplement! Solo Adventurers are welcome. Most cabin categories on the ship are available as a private cabin to single travelers at no additional cost.
  • A recommended packing list will be provided upon booking.

PLEASE NOTE

This program features activities such as walking, wildlife viewing, and Zodiac cruising, all at a relatively easy to moderate level of exertion. The majority of shore landings are undertaken using Zodiacs. Zodiac embarkations involve descending gangway stairs with double handrails and stepping into the Zodiac from a small platform at water level (assistance is provided).

Payment Details

Deposit, Taxes and Discounts

  • A $1000.00 USD deposit is required to hold your reservation.
  • Balance of payment is due 120 days before trip commencement.
  • Travellers under 30 receive a 30% discount.
  • No single supplement charge on most of the cabin categories.

CANCELLATION POLICY & DETAILS

  • All requests for cancellations must be received in writing.
  • Cancellations received at least 120 days prior to departure are fully refunded less an administration fee of $500 US dollars per passenger.
  • If cancellation is made between 91 and 120 days, the cancellation charge is 65% of the cruise cost.
  • Please note that within the 90-day limit, all deposits and tariffs are forfeited.
  • Trip cancellation insurance is not included, but highly recommended.